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9 comments

[–] Dii_Casses 1 points (+1|-0)

I think part of the problem is the flat dismissal of the idea that alternative facts exist. Of course they do. You can only fit a dozen or so facts into an article, and the number of facts left out are literally infinite. Most are, of course, irrelevant (age of the oldest person on earth, the temperature under my fridge, the apples:potatoes ratio at the nearest grocery store). It is the journalists' job to choose which facts are most salient to a given topic.

And they've chosen more and more poorly over the last 30 years.

[–] unruly [OP] 2 points (+2|-0)

Really?

Many journalists scoffed at Spicer’s defiant distortion of the truth, but Senior Counselor to President Trump, Kellyanne Conway, came to his defence with the extraordinary claim that the press secretary had simply been using “alternative facts”

[–] Dii_Casses 0 points (+0|-0) Edited

See back to the part about not trusting government or media. There were axes to grind, and if one person disputed a Trump claim, they dogpiled onto that like it was gospel. And given the infinite array of facts I previously mentioned, it is easy to fish for an expert that says what you want to write.

It was embarrassing to watch.