6 comments

[–] xyzzy 2 points (+2|-0)

While I'm all against planned obsolecence, in-ear headphones are not built for two years of daily use. If they were they'd cost so much more, almost no one would buy them. Sure they might be the latest and gratest hipster-approved hardware when they release, but in the end it's electronics and plastic and they tend to fail after years of use.

[–] Sarcastaway 0 points (+0|-0)

I agree with what you're saying, but I have some etymotic IEMs at that price point and they've have lasted me nearly 4 years with consistent weekday use. I think the difference is that I only use them when I'm stationary, and I really baby them when put them in their case.

What really bothers me is the lack of repair options mentioned in the article.

[–] xyzzy 1 points (+1|-0)

I have some etymotic IEMs at that price point and they've have lasted me nearly 4 years with consistent weekday use

Likely yours are just on the right of bell curve of product life. They're likely designed to fail shortly after the warranty ends, so you'd buy new ones.

I only use them when I'm stationary, and I really baby them when put them in their case.

That sure makes a difference

lack of repair options

Look at the size of the things: repairing is not economically viable unless you're in China.